Songs I Hate to Love

Have you ever heard a song you hate to love? 

Me, too.

My most recently hated song is Eric Church’s “love” ballad, Like A Wrecking Ball.

There are lots of reasons why I hate this song but still consider it one of my current guilty pleasures.

WHAT I HATE ABOUT WRECKING BALL

Not a big Willie Nelson fan, and man, this guy sounds like him.

I think the tale Wrecking Ball tells is crude, raw, and slightly abusive.

I worry that men, especially young men, will think this is what romantic love is all about; knocking your partner against the wall while you ravage her sexually.

I worry that women, young women, also think this is what love looks like.

I hate that this song always, always reminds me of Miley Cyrus, who seems to have gotten this whole wrecking ball trend rolling. Not a big Miley fan, either, obviously.

This song incorporates organ music that reminds me of my roller-skating days, or the carousel at the park, which feels icky given the juxtaposition of the music to the story it tells.

The song is what music execs call “sticky,” meaning it gets stuck in your head.  Sticky is what you want in a hit song, but it’s also what makes the song so darn hard to extricate from one’s memory.

Here is a clip of the song, if you haven’t heard it yet.  Thankfully, this is not a music video.  I have not seen that, and I don’t think I want to given the subject matter.  However, I cannot get the image of a young, sexy thing painting her toenails on the bathroom sink out of my head, with or without seeing the music video.  If you listen to the song, you’ll understand.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT LIKE A WRECKING BALL

There are lots of things about this song I don’t like, but…

I do love the acoustic guitar and rhythm used by the writer to convey his moody blues. 

I also love the passion the writer expresses for his partner (hoping his wife, but who knows).

I love the raw, honest, and exposed “truth” he tells about passionate love  from his experience.  Note: I do not find this song romantic.

I love the way the song makes me hate it and love it at the same time.

I think the writer is brilliant at painting pictures with lyrics and song.

I love that I can hate some of what this song stands for, but love some of it too.  For instance, I love that the musician in the song waits to be intimate with the one he truly loves, instead of pursuing something that might temporarily satisfy his libido but will leave him spiritually hungry and full of guilt. When we truly love someone, we ought to be able to wait.

I love that I can appreciate how this song is “laid down” and put together, without breaking out hunks of sheet rock in the process.

[You gotta hear the song to understand that last one].

I find Like A Wrecking Ball disturbingly sticky and kinda mesmerizing. So much so that I can’t bring myself to turn the station when it comes on the radio.  Instead, when I hear Eric Church begin explaining to me what it’s gonna be like when he breaks through the door on that first night home after touring, I simply shake my head and say once again, “Man, this guy sounds like Willie Nelson!”

He really does!  Scary similar!!!

Are you a Willie Nelson or Eric Church fan?  What song do you hate to love?

 

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5 thoughts on “Songs I Hate to Love

  1. I listen to classical and easy gentle rock. I don’t listen to music very often. I will sometimes listen while doing indoor cardio, but never while lifting weights. I need to focus to work a muscle thoroughly without hurting myself. I don’t even pay attention to the loud overhead TV’s throughout the gym.

    • I hear you about hurting yourself when you’re not focused. Focus is so important when working out. About as important as balance is to all around good health.

      You seem to have figured it all out quite well. My second comment for your recent blog would be: Oh, goodness!!!

      You’re doing something right!!! 🙂

  2. I’m with you. Art in general always feels like it has to push boundaries somewhere, but my favorite types are the kinds that simply evoke a meaningful memory. Nothing dramatic, nothing harsh or abusive or shocking, just reality reframed.

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